January 2015

10 ways to Earn a 10x Return from the United Real Estate Convention

  • Increase your income; attend the 2015 convention.

    Increase your income; attend the 2015 convention.

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We know it’s difficult to get away but with national speakers, multiple training sessions and agents from across the world, the 2015 United Real Estate Convention is guaranteed to increase your productivity – and income – in 2015. Join us in Dallas March 19 – 21, 2015.

  • Implement one technology strategy from Andrew Dorn’s talk. Andrew Dorn is a National Speaker from Realtor.com®.
  • Retrain your brain to recognize and better capitalize on your current resources. Michele Gielan from GoodThink, Inc. will show you the way.
  • Catch CEO Dan Duffy in the halls and spend ten minutes talking to him.  He’s a hub of knowledge and his positivity is highly contagious.
  • Meet one new colleague who you refer a deal to.
  • Learn how to build your personal brand the right way.
  • Walk away with a roadmap to secure premier listings and entire development projects through Enhanced Marketing Services (EMS).
  • Identify six areas that will help you be specific about the best client for your skills and strengths.  Then build a plan on how to serve them.
  • Learn how to buy and sell existing books of business with Succession Planning
  • Fine tune your business by focusing on the things that make the most difference.
  • Learn one risk reduction technique in our digital world.

Interested in attending? Contact us at eventteam@unitedrealestate.com or (855) 441-6288- we’re happy to answer your questions or help get you registered. Or register online by visiting UREConvention.com.

Out with the Mold

We’ve got a quick guide on how to handle this homeowner nightmare without losing your cool. Depending on the severity, clean-up could range from a quick DIY cleaning, to something a professional must handle.

What it is:

Mold is a fungus that can be found both indoors and outdoors – the exact number of species is unknown but its in the range from 10,000 to 300,000 plus.

Bathroom mold

Don’t let mold take-over your home.

As you likely know, mold grows best in warm, damp and humid conditions. Mold sources include a variety of household ailments such as flooding, leaky roofs, backed-up drains, humidifiers, damp basements or crawl spaces, house plants, shower steam or leaks, and even wet clothes drying indoors. Mold spores can survive harsh environmental conditions, even dry conditions that typically do not support normal mold growth – this is why through clean-up is so essential.

Depending on your sensitivity, reactions can range from nasal stuffiness, eye irritation, wheezing, or skin irritation to fever or lung disease. Severe reactions may include fever and shortness of breath. Some people with chronic lung illnesses, such as obstructive lung disease, may develop mold infections in their lungs.

The general rule is, if you can see it or smell it, it needs to go.

What to Do:

Ultimately, it is critical to remove the source of moisture first, before beginning remedial action, since mold growth will quickly return if the infected area becomes wet again. After you’ve corrected the source of the problem, arrange for removal.

If the moldy area is less than about 10 sq. ft., you can handle the job yourself by following the guidelines put out by the EPA. Guidelines for acceptable levels of mold have not been established, varying from person to person. If you are hiring a professional, be very through in your vetting process.

Porous materials such as drywall, carpet and ceiling tiles need to be cut away where the mold is growing; mold can grow inside the material, not just on the surface. Bag and dispose of any materials that have mold residue such as rags, paper or other debris.

What Not to Do:

  • Mold does not need to be tested (per the CDC); any visible mold should be eliminated
  • Do not touch mold or moldy items with bare hands
  • Do not get mold or mold spores in your eyes
  • Do not breathe in mold or mold spores
  • Do not items that can’t be cleaned – get rid of ‘em. This will likely be anything porous – carpet, wood, clothing, rags, etc.

Once the mold has been removed, continue to keep an eye on the situation. Was the source of the problem effectively corrected? If hidden mold is discovered, it is time to go back to the drawing board. Additional remediation will likely be needed. Ultimately, the only way to eliminate mold is to eliminate the moisture causing it.

Source: http://www.epa.gov/mold/mold_remediation.html

A Career with United Real Estate

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Whether you’ve been in real estate your entire career or are interested in getting started, United Real Estate has the solution for you.

Our Jumpstart Program helps new agents get their careers started by teaching the stepping stones to being successful in real estate. If you complete the training requirements, your registration fee will be 100-percent reimbursed after you make a sale.

Or if you’ve been in the business for years, our Accelerate program helps agents boost their careers with listing/selling techniques, tips for enhanced productivity and marketing/prospecting best practices.

The best part? United Real Estate agents earn 100-percent commission. Our company doesn’t take any percentage of the commission our agents earn when clients buy or sell a home. Unlike other franchises, which sometimes demand up to a 50-sspercent split in commission, you’ll enjoy 100 percent real estate commission on every transaction. The only charges you’ll be dealing with are a small transaction fee ($300-$600; variable by region) and a $65 monthly office fee.

This arrangement also benefits clients. It motivates each agent to provide the best service available in order to earn that commission. It’s a win-win situation for our agents and their clients.

Want to learn more about joining our team? Stop by JoinUnitedRealEstate.com or visit our Facebook page for more information.

Is Your Fireplace Safe to Use?

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If you’ve recently moved into a new home, or never used your fireplace, follow our quick checklist to determine if building a fire in your fireplace is a safe idea. As a general rule, chimneys should be cleaned annually so if you don’t know the last time yours was cleaned, you’ll likely want to hold off on building a fire.

Before lighting your fire, here are a few things to keep in mind:

1. Check Outside –  If possible, climb up to your roof and examine the chimney cap to make sure it is present and in good repair. The metal cap keeps animals, rain and snow out of the chimney, while also preventing sparks or hot embers from landing on your roofing. If you don’t have a chimney cap, installing one is a good idea.

If you have a multi-story home or a steep roof, play it safe and use a pair of binoculars to check the chimney cap from the ground. Make sure there isn’t a bird nest, tree limbs or other debris, on or near the chimney. Also make sure that the mortar and bricks are not in good condition and rise at least two feet above where it exists the roof.

2.  From the Inside – First, use a flashlight to inspect the flue damper, making sure it opens, closes and seals properly. With the damper open, check the flue for combustible material such as animal nests or other foreign objects. You should be able to see daylight at the top.

Inspect the area around the fireplace, making sure there are no cracked bricks or missing mortar. Damage inside the firebox is serious and should be looked at professionally.

3. Making the Fire – Be sure to stay safe while the fire is in the fireplace too – making sure to keep the fire at a moderate size and always using a metal grate. Clear the area of books, furniture, newspaper or anything else that might catch fire or be damaged by embers; two feet of distance is a good rule. Using kindling is always safer than starting the fire with gas.

Gas fireplaces are lower maintenance but that doesn’t mean they still don’t need occasional attention. If you have a gas burning fireplace, check that the gas logs are in proper position and that the glass doors are secure. Turn off the gas at the shut-off valve and test the igniter. After igniting the fire, check for clogged burner holes.

Ultimately, use common sense. Don’t burn items such as garbage or plastic and don’t start fires with gasoline. Always make sure the fire is out before going to bed or leaving the house and when in doubt, contact a professional to have your chimney checked for safety concerns. Stay warm and enjoy your home this winter.